presentation

Webinar: Use Digital Portfolios with Maximum Impact

I recently co-facilitated two webinars with Laura Stewart at FreshGrade (www.freshgrade.com) about using digital portfolios with students to maximize learning. One of the archived webinars is embedded below.

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What I'm Writing

What I’m Writing: December 2015

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Maximize Learning, Not Technology (ASCD EDge, October 2015)

In this promotional post for my new book, I highlight specific examples of how the necessary vs. nice dichotomy applies to classroom technology choices. For example, having one device for every learner in a classroom would be nice, but the lack of academic benefits identified with this type of initiative leads us to keep the ratio down in our own school. By identifying the purpose for the learning, schools are able to take a reasonable approach to the inclusion of digital tools in classrooms.

Online Learning Communities: Real Conversations, or Mere Connections? (Chalkup, December 1, 2015)

The concept of “community” has been redefined in the digital age. Whereas a 20th century understanding would have included some aspect of face-to-face interaction, today’s world does not. Google Hangouts, Voxer, and Facebook groups all seem to provide a sense of community, especially when focused around a specific topic. But do these interactions replace real conversations, which includes being in the physical presence of others?

BYOD in the Classroom: Necessary or Nice? (Middleweb, December 9, 2015)

BYOD, an acronym for “Bring Your Own Device”, garners many opinions. Technology purists might say that by not allowing every student to have access to a world of knowledge, we are depriving them of the necessary connections available. Traditionalists point to the distractibility of students when they bring their smartphones and tablets to class. This post highlights a specific situation where technology helps deepen student understanding in a secondary English classroom around a conceptual study of isolation.

A Principal Shares Tech Benefits for the 1:1 Skeptic (Ed Tech K-12, December 15, 2015)

One of the biggest myths out there in education is that every student needs to have access to mobile technology while at school. This idea pervades despite the evidence that young people’s abilities to read emotions and empathize with others is decreased the more they use social media via their smartphones. These online connections tend to replace in-person relationships. However, having one device per student can be necessary given the context of the learning. For example, students with dyslexia greatly benefit from word prediction software while reading.

A Better Resolution

My wife and I have plans to eat at a new restaurant soon. The owner has two other eateries in the area which we’ve enjoyed, so we are excited for this new experience. Friends of ours will be joining us, as this occasion is also in celebration of my wife’s birthday.

We don’t eat at one of these restaurants often, as this type of dining is more expensive than your standard fare. Even so, when I share with others how much we spend on one of these evenings out, they are sometimes surprised. “You could eat out for a lot cheaper elsewhere!” someone brought up. True. Yet we continue to come back to these establishments.

How we spend our limited time and our finite resources represents what we value. We bring joy to our lives through these experiences. They are about us. For example, I write because I enjoy writing. I find it both personally and professionally rewarding. My work benefits others, as what I share online has been found useful by educators. But I write more for myself.

Is this selfish? Some might think so. An article in the New York Times today discusses how many acts of gratitude are often self-serving and have little impact on those who actually need support and appreciation.

It’s good to express our thanks, of course, to those who deserve recognition. But this holiday gratitude is all about you, and how you can feel better.

Probably true, yet I don’t think the author had educators in mind when she composed this article.

Educating students is the lifework of teacher and administrators. We guide the marginalized and disadvantaged every day.  This profession we’ve chosen is one of the most selfless in the world. Depending on one’s beliefs, you could say we are doing God’s work every day. Do we need to give even more? Many of us do regardless. But I don’t think I am wrong in justifying that those who work in schools could benefit from a little self-indulgence.

So I am suggesting to all educators to make one resolution this year: Take care of yourselves. How might this look? Sleep in on the weekends. Watch a movie without a pile of papers to grade on your lap. Read a book that has nothing to do with school. Attend a rock concert. Eat at a fancy restaurant. Whatever you choose, do what makes you happy. You’ve earned it. That you will be a better educator for the time you take for yourself is gravy. As we prepare for a new year, I hope you make you a priority.